As a Canadian, I never really had to think much about school. In fact, I always kind of thought of it as a tedious obligation my parents constantly reminded me about. Like most youth, I groaned in the morning when it started and happily threw off my backpack as soon as the last bell rang, only to pick it up when required at the start of the next school day.

STORY CONTINUES BELOW

I put in the minimum effort that kept my parents off my back, mostly enjoyed the social aspects of school and only really applied myself when I realized that I would have to get into post secondary if I wanted a lifestyle similar to my parents. I didn’t hate school, some subjects I quite enjoyed, but it definitely wasn’t my top priority until I needed to utilize it to reach my adult ambitions.

STORY CONTINUES BELOW

For many Canadians, school is a duty and given part of childhood. Often, the few memories former students speak of are negative ones, painting the entire institution in a negative hue. for those in developing countries and/or who live rurally, it’s a prize few can ever access. “School The World”, is a not for profit organisation that transforms lives by working to make quality education accessible to all children and families living in rural villages of Central America. I encourage you to watch their most recent video as it shows the stark contrast between the average Guatemalan and American student.

However, for those in developing countries and/or who live rurally, it’s a prize few can ever access. “School The World”, is a not for profit organisation that transforms lives by working to make quality education accessible to all families living in rural villages of Central America. I encourage you to watch their most recent video as it shows the stark contrast between the average Guatemalan and American students’ morning.

If you’re interested in learning more about this story, or to view the video, you may view the reliable source used to gather this information.

Featured image background source.